My HFA Inhaler is Broken!

Patients often bring in their inhalers and state, “This stupid inhaler is broken!”  I take a look at it and the funny thing is, I have yet to find an actually broken HFA inhaler.  I am sure there are some busted HFA inhalers out there but the real issue here -clogged HFA inhalers! 

Yes, those inhalers NEED to be cleaned.  Most HFA inhalers should be cleaned WEEKLY.  When I tell people this their eyes usually bug out and they say, “Weekly???”

So the bad news is that it needs to be done weekly….the good news is that it is quite easy!  You just take the metal canister out (the canister holds the actual drug).  Then rinse the plastic inhaler with warm water for 30 seconds.  Allow it to air dry thoroughly before using it again.  

It is really that simple -the plastic part of the inhaler gets clogged and needs to be rinsed.  It is good to clean it weekly even if you do not notice any problems because it is possible that you are not receiving as much of the medicine as you should.

Just a note here -with the change from the “old generic inhalers” to the new brand only HFA inhalers, the price has definitely increased!  For some help with prescription assistance call the American Lung Association Lung Helpline at 800-LUNG-USA (option 2).

If you would like to learn more ways to save please see 90 Ways to Save on Your Prescription Drugs.

Be Sociable, Share!

Did you enjoy this post? Why not leave a comment below and continue the conversation, or subscribe to my feed and get articles like this delivered automatically to your feed reader.

Comments

If you think cleaning an HFA inhaler will make it more efficient you are delusional. Most users of HFA inhalers immediately and correctly realize that HFA is not the same medication than “the old generic CFC inhalers”.

The core drugs are the same but there are new, unsafe additives. Furthermore, HFA inhalers were improperly tested and approved by overzealous, ambitious people who had selfish agendas and stood to gain fortunes. It is amazing how the EPA and FDA, along with IPAC hoodwinked and achieved approval in an unprecedented changeover. In the history of the US FDA this type of change for nonmedical reasons has “never” occurred.

Ethanol is a sticky substance, if it clogs the inhaler so often-what do you think it does inside the lungs? Lung patients are now vulnerable to the dangerous side effects of Ethanol (HFA) laced inhalers.

Of course with any new patented drug the drug company can charge enormous amounts of money. But cost should be the least of HFA inhaler users issues–if they use HFA inhalers long enough, they’ll pay so much in medical fees and emergencies rooms visits, it’ll make their head spin. I know—I’ve been suffering for almost two years –thanks to HFA inhalers.

Thank you for the information!

Well i had the same problem which is why I am on this site. My HFA inhaler would change in number wjen i press it..but nothing would come out. So i ran under warm water and dry it out. It started working again. O wish i google the problem sooner because had I did I would save 6 spray doses

Leave a comment

(required)

(required)